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HWA Tutorial On Intel GPU

This tutorial guides you on setting up full video hardware acceleration on Intel integrated GPUs and ARC discrete GPUs via QSV and VA-API.

Acceleration Methods

Hardware accelerated transcoding is supported on most Intel GPUs.

On Windows QSV is the only available method.

On Linux there are two methods:

  • QSV - Prefered on mainstream GPUs, for better performance

  • VA-API - Required by pre-Broadwell legacy GPUs, for compatibility

note

Linux VA-API supports nearly all Intel GPUs.

Linux QSV supported platforms are limited to:

  • BDW (Broadwell)

  • SKL (Skylake)

  • BXTx (BXT: Broxton, APL: Apollo Lake, GLK: Gemini Lake)

  • KBLx (KBL: Kaby Lake, CFL: Coffe Lake, WHL: Whiskey Lake, CML: Comet Lake, AML: Amber Lake)

  • ICL (Ice Lake)

  • JSL (Jasper Lake) / EHL (Elkhart Lake)

  • TGLx (TGL: Tiger Lake, RKL: Rocket Lake, ADL-S/P/N: Alder Lake, RPL-S/P: Raptor Lake)

  • DG1/SG1

  • Alchemist (DG2)/ATSM

  • Meteor Lake (MTL)

  • Future platforms...

The QSV interface provided by Intel OneVPL / MediaSDK is a high-level implementation based on Linux VA-API and Windows DXVA/D3D11VA providing better performance and more fine-tuning options on supported platforms.

QSV can be used together with VA-API and DXVA/D3D11VA for a more flexible hybrid transcoding pipeline.

note
  • Unlike NVIDIA NVENC, there is no concurrent encoding sessions limit on Intel iGPU and ARC dGPU.

  • QSV and VA-API support headless server on both Windows and Linux, which means a connected monitor is not required.

Tone-mapping Methods

Hardware accelerated HDR/DV to SDR tone-mapping is supported on all Intel GPUs that have HEVC 10-bit decoding.

There are two different methods that can be used on Windows and/or Linux. Pros and cons are listed below:

  1. OpenCL

    • Pros - Supports Dolby Vision P5, detailed fine-tuning options, widely supported hardware.

    • Cons - The OpenCL runtime sometimes need to be manually installed on Linux.

  2. QSV VPP

    • Pros - Lower power consumption, realized by Intel fixed-function LUT hardware.

    • Cons - Poor tuning options, limited supported GPU models, currently only available on Linux.

note

The Prefer OS native DXVA or VA-API hardware decoders feature toggles between the native decoders and the QSV decoders. Dolby Vision support requires that this option be checked.

Select GPU Hardware

For beginners, please refer to the Hardware Selection Guide for tips on selecting hardware. For expert users, please continue reading this section.

caution

Do not use models of Intel processors ending with "F" - those do not have an integrated GPU.

Quick Sync Video support can be checked via the Intel ark website prior to buying a new GPU suitable for hardware acceleration.

Transcode H.264

AVC / H.264 8-bit is still widely used due to its excellent compatibility. All Intel GPUs that support QSV can decode and encode it.

  • Decoding & Encoding H.264 8-bit - Any Intel GPU that supports Quick Sync Video (QSV)

Transcode HEVC

HEVC / H.265 remains the first choice for storing 4K 10-bit, HDR and Dolby Vision video. It has mature software encoding support thanks to x265, as well as the widely implemented hardware encoding support in most GPUs released after 2016.

Intel GPUs are no exception:

  • Decoding & Encoding HEVC 8-bit - Gen 9 Sky Lake (6th Gen Core) and newer

  • Decoding & Encoding HEVC 10-bit - Gen 9.5 Kaby Lake (7th Gen Core), Apollo Lake, Gemini Lake (Pentium and Celeron) and newer

note

Note that the 6th Gen Core lacks 10-bit support, it's best to choose 7th Gen and newer processors, which usually have HD / UHD 6xx series iGPU.

Transcode AV1

AV1 is a royalty-free, future-proof video codec. It saves a lot of storage space and network bandwidth due to smaller file size. The downside is that decoding and encoding is very demanding on the CPU. Hardware acceleration makes it possible to transcode AV1 streams on the fly. AV1 encoding is supported in Jellyfin 10.9 and newer.

Intel added support for AV1 acceleration in their latest GPUs:

  • Decoding AV1 8/10-bit - Gen 12 Tiger Lake (11th Gen Core) and newer

  • Encoding AV1 8/10-bit - Gen 12.5 DG2 / ARC A-series, Gen 12.7 Meteor Lake (14th Gen Core Mobile / 1st Gen Core Ultra) and newer

note

Note that Jasper Lake and Elkhart Lake processors are 10th Gen Pentium/Celeron/Atom, which don't have AV1 acceleration.

Transcode Other Codecs

Please refer to these links:

Speed And Quality

Intel improves the speed and video quality of its fixed-function encoders between each generation of graphics architectures.

They can be divided into 4 tiers by their performance:

  • Entry-Level - HD / UHD 500, 600, 605 and 61x

    tip

    These iGPUs usually come from mini PC boxes or Synology NASes and they can transcode HEVC 10-bit and apply tone-mapping filters. You can't expect much due to performance and power constraints, but it's still adequate for personal use.

  • Mainstream - HD / UHD 620, 630, Iris 640, 655 and the Gen 11 graphics

    tip

    These iGPUs have more computing power than entry-level, which makes them capable of multiple 4k HDR HEVC 10-bit transcoding at the same time. Note that the Gen 11 graphics have a slightly improved encoder quality over Gen 9.

  • High-Performance - UHD 7xx series and Iris Xe graphics

    tip

    These GPUs use Gen 12 XeLP architecture with AV1 hardware decoding, significantly improved video quality and speed. Models like the UHD 770 and Iris Xe feature a second MFX video engine, which enhances its concurrent transcoding capabilities.

  • Hardcore - ARC A-series discrete and integrated GPU

    tip

    ARC A-series GPUs use the latest Gen 12.5 XeHPG architecture, which continues to improve on the basis of XeLP, supports AV1 hardware encoding and improved H.264 and HEVC encoding. This makes it competitive with the medium preset of the x264 and x265 software encoders. All ARC A-series GPU models come with two MFX video engines.

OneVPL And MediaSDK

OneVPL is a new QSV implementation to supersede MediaSDK. Both provide the Quick Sync Video (QSV) runtime.

Intel supports OneVPL on Gen 12+ graphics (11th Gen Core and newer processor, namely Tiger Lake & Rocket Lake).

note
  • The most notable difference is that OneVPL supports the new AV1 hardware encoder on ARC GPU.

  • FFmpeg 6.0 enables OneVPL. This process is seamless for the end users.

ARC GPU Support

Jellyfin server 10.8.9+ and the latest jellyfin-ffmpeg5 support Intel ARC discrete GPU on both Windows and Linux 6.2+.

You only need to follow the Windows Setups and Linux Setups to configure and verify it.

tip
  • Resizable-BAR is not mandatory for hardware acceleration, but it can affect the graphics performance. It's recommended to enable the Resizable-BAR if the processor, motherboard and BIOS support it.

  • ASPM should be enabled in the BIOS if supported. This greatly reduces the idle power consumption of the ARC GPU.

  • Low-Power encoding is used by default on ARC GPUs. GuC & HuC firmware can be missing on older distros, you might need to manually download it from the Kernel firmware git.

  • Old kernel build configs may not have the MEI modules enabled, which are necessary for using ARC GPU on Linux.

Windows Setups

Windows 10 64-bit and newer is recommeded. QSV is not available on Windows Docker and WSL/WSL2.

Known Issues And Limitations On Windows

caution

There are some known Windows driver issues that can affect the Intel hardware transcoding. Some of them can be fixed by downgrading or upgrading your graphics driver.

  1. Intel 11th Gen and newer UHD, Xe and ARC series integrated and discrete GPUs have an Windows graphics driver issue in 31.0.101.5186 / 31.0.101.5234 and newer. You may encounter a green screen but normal sound when transcoding and playing HDR videos that require tone-mapping. The last known working driver is 31.0.101.5085 / 31.0.101.5122, and the problem can be solved by downgrading to it and disabling automatic updates. You can follow the status of this driver issue through the ticket below.

Configure On Windows Host

  1. Wipe the old driver with DDU if you upgraded from a pre-6th Gen Intel processor without doing a fresh installation.

  2. Clean install the latest EXE or INF driver from Intel download center.

  3. Don't allow the GPU to be preempted by the Windows Remote desktop session.

    • Type gpedit.msc in Win+R shortcut key dialog and run to open the "Local Group Policy Editor".

    • Navigate in the left tree [Computer Configuratoin > Administrative Templates > Windows Components]

    • Here you can find [Remote Desktop Services > Remote Desktop Session Host > Remote Session Environment]

    • On the right side, double click the [Use hardware graphics adapters for all Remote Desktop Services sessions]

    • Set [Disabled] in the pop-up dialog window and click [OK], reboot the system.

    Remote desktop GPU setup

  4. Enable QSV in Jellyfin and uncheck the unsupported codecs.

Verify On Windows

  1. Play a video in the Jellyfin web client and trigger a video transcoding by setting a lower resolution or bitrate.

  2. Open the "Task Manager" and navigate to the GPU page.

  3. Check the occupancy of the engines as follows.

    note

    Duplicate engine names indicate the GPU may have multiple MFX video engines.

    • 3D - 2D/3D engine, QSV VPP or GPGPU workload

    • Copy - Blitter/Copy engine workload

    • Video Decode - QSV decoder or encoder workload

    • Video Processing - QSV VPP processor workload

    • Compute - GPGPU or QSV VPP workload (only available on ARC / DG2+)

    Verify Intel On Windows

Linux Setups

A 64-bit Linux distribution is required. The supported GPU varies by kernel and firmware versions.

Known Issues And Limitations On Linux

caution

There are some known upstream Linux Kernel and firmware issues that can affect the Intel hardware transcoding. Some of them can be fixed by upgrading your Linux distro, kernel and firmware packages, or adding the required kernel parameters.

  1. Intel Gen 11 Jasper Lake and Elkhart Lake platforms (e.g. N5095, N5105, N6005, J6412) have quirks when using video encoders on Linux. The Low-Power Encoding mode MUST be configured and enabled for correct VBR and CBR bitrate control that is required by Jellyfin.

  2. The default kernel 5.15 that comes with Ubuntu 22.04 LTS has a regression on Intel Gen 11 graphics (ICL, JSL and EHL) that prevent you from using the Low-Power encoding mode. Linux 5.16+ is not affected.

    sudo apt install --install-recommends linux-generic-hwe-22.04
    caution

    This will move you off a 5.15 kernel which could have other implications. If it breaks something you can return to the normal kernel by installing the linux-generic package.

  3. The kernel range from 5.18 to 6.1.3 have an issue that locks up and resets the i915 kernel driver when using OpenCL based HDR/DV tone-mapping. Linux 5.18-, 6.0.18+, 6.1.4+ are not affected.

  4. The current Debian 11 and Ubuntu 22.04 LTS may not have the required GPU firmware for Intel 12th Gen processors and ARC GPU.

  5. The kernel support for Intel Gen 12 TGL graphics is incomplete before Linux 5.9.

  6. The kernel support for Intel Gen 12 DG1 is incomplete in upstream. Intel DKMS and custom iHD driver are required.

  7. The kernel support for Intel Gen 12 ADL graphics is incomplete before Linux 5.17.

  8. The kernel support for Intel Gen 12.5 DG2 / ARC A-series is incomplete before Linux 6.2.

  9. The kernel support for Intel Gen 12.7 MTL is incomplete before Linux 6.7.

Configure On Linux Host

Debian And Ubuntu Linux

The jellyfin-ffmpeg5 deb package required by Jellyfin 10.8 comes with all necessary user mode Intel media drivers.

Besides that you only need to install the OpenCL runtime and configure the the permission of jellyfin user.

note

Root permission is required.

  1. Assuming you have added the jellyfin repository to your apt source list and installed the jellyfin-server and jellyfin-web.

  2. Install the jellyfin-ffmpeg5 package. Remove the deprecated jellyfin meta package if it breaks the dependencies:

    sudo apt update && sudo apt install -y jellyfin-ffmpeg5
  3. Make sure at least one renderD* device exists in /dev/dri. Otherwise upgrade your kernel or enable the iGPU in the BIOS.

    note

    Note the permissions and group available to write to it, in this case it is render:

    $ ls -l /dev/dri

    total 0
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 120 Mar 5 05:15 by-path
    crw-rw----+ 1 root video 226, 0 Mar 5 05:15 card0
    crw-rw----+ 1 root video 226, 1 Mar 5 05:15 card1
    crw-rw----+ 1 root render 226, 128 Mar 5 05:15 renderD128
    crw-rw----+ 1 root render 226, 129 Mar 5 05:15 renderD129
  4. Add the jellyfin user to the render group, then restart jellyfin service:

    note

    On some releases, the group may be video or input instead of render.

    sudo usermod -aG render jellyfin
    sudo systemctl restart jellyfin
  5. Check the version of intel-opencl-icd thats the Linux distro provides:

    $ apt policy intel-opencl-icd

    intel-opencl-icd:
    Installed: (none)
    Candidate: 22.14.22890-1
    ...
  6. If the version is newer than 22.xx.xxxxx just install it. For the latest products like N95/N100 and Arc A380, support is provided in 23.xx.xxxxx and newer. Otherwise install from Intel compute-runtime repository.

    sudo apt install -y intel-opencl-icd
  7. Check the supported QSV / VA-API codecs:

    note
    • iHD driver indicates support for the QSV and VA-API interfaces.

    • i965 driver indicates only support for the VA-API interface, which should only be used on pre-Broadwell platforms.

    sudo /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/vainfo --display drm --device /dev/dri/renderD128

    libva info: VA-API version 1.17.0
    libva info: Trying to open /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/lib/dri/iHD_drv_video.so
    libva info: Found init function __vaDriverInit_1_17
    libva info: va_openDriver() returns 0
    Trying display: drm
    vainfo: VA-API version: 1.17 (libva 2.17.0)
    vainfo: Driver version: Intel iHD driver for Intel(R) Gen Graphics - 23.1.2 (xxxxxxx)
    vainfo: Supported profile and entrypoints
    ...
  8. Check the OpenCL runtime status:

    sudo /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/ffmpeg -v verbose -init_hw_device vaapi=va:/dev/dri/renderD128 -init_hw_device opencl@va

    [AVHWDeviceContext @ 0x55cc8ac21a80] 0.0: Intel(R) OpenCL HD Graphics / Intel(R) Iris(R) Xe Graphics [0x9a49]
    [AVHWDeviceContext @ 0x55cc8ac21a80] Intel QSV to OpenCL mapping function found (clCreateFromVA_APIMediaSurfaceINTEL).
    [AVHWDeviceContext @ 0x55cc8ac21a80] Intel QSV in OpenCL acquire function found (clEnqueueAcquireVA_APIMediaSurfacesINTEL).
    [AVHWDeviceContext @ 0x55cc8ac21a80] Intel QSV in OpenCL release function found (clEnqueueReleaseVA_APIMediaSurfacesINTEL).
    ...
  9. If you wish to use the second GPU, change renderD128 to renderD129 in the Jellyfin dashboard.

  10. Enable QSV or VA-API in Jellyfin and uncheck the unsupported codecs.

Linux Mint

Linux Mint uses Ubuntu as its package base.

You can follow the configuration steps of Debian And Ubuntu Linux but install all Jellyfin packages jellyfin-server, jellyfin-web and jellyfin-ffmpeg5 manually from the Jellyfin Server Releases Page. Also make sure you choose the correct codename by following the official version maps.

Arch Linux

note

Root permission is required.

  1. Install the Archlinux/extra jellyfin-ffmpeg package:

    sudo pacman -Syu jellyfin-ffmpeg
  2. User mode Intel media drivers and the OpenCL runtime are required to be manually installed for enabling QSV / VA-API:

  3. Check the QSV / VA-API codecs and the OpenCL runtime status:

    sudo pacman -Syu libva-utils
    sudo vainfo --display drm --device /dev/dri/renderD128
    sudo /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/ffmpeg -v verbose -init_hw_device vaapi=va:/dev/dri/renderD128 -init_hw_device opencl@va
  4. Check to the remaining parts of Debian And Ubuntu Linux.

Other Distros

We provide portable jellyfin-ffmpeg binaries for distros that don't have a regular maintainer.

They can be downloaded from one of these links:

note

Minimum requirements for glibc and Linux versions:

  • x86_64 / amd64 - glibc >= 2.23, Linux >= 4.4 (most distros released in 2016 and later)

Extract and install it to the correct path, change the FFmpeg path in the Jellyfin dashboard to match it:

note

Root permission is required.

cd ~/
mkdir -p jellyfin-ffmpeg
wget https://repo.jellyfin.org/releases/ffmpeg/<VERSION>/jellyfin-ffmpeg_<VERSION>_portable_linux64-gpl.tar.xz
tar -xvf jellyfin-ffmpeg_<VERSION>_portable_linux64-gpl.tar.xz -C jellyfin-ffmpeg
sudo mv jellyfin-ffmpeg /usr/lib
sudo ldd -v /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/ffmpeg

Install other necessary Intel driver packages and their dependencies that contain these key words:

  • Intel media driver - iHD

  • Intel vaapi driver - i965

  • Intel media sdk - MFX

  • Intel oneVPL-intel-gpu - VPL

  • Intel compute runtime - OpenCL

Configure With Linux Virtualization

Official Docker

The official Docker image comes with all necessary user mode Intel media drivers and the OpenCL runtime.

What you need to do is pass the host's render group id to Docker and modify the configurations to meet your requirements.

  1. Query the id of the render group on the host system and use it in the Docker CLI or docker-compose file:

    note

    On some releases, the group may be video or input instead of render.

    getent group render | cut -d: -f3
  2. Use docker command line or docker-compose:

    • Example command line:

      docker run -d \
      --name=jellyfin \
      --volume /path/to/config:/config \
      --volume /path/to/cache:/cache \
      --volume /path/to/media:/media \
      --user 1000:1000 \
      --group-add="122" \ # Change this to match your "render" host group id and remove this comment
      --net=host \
      --restart=unless-stopped \
      --device /dev/dri/renderD128:/dev/dri/renderD128 \
      jellyfin/jellyfin
    • Example docker-compose (version 3) configuration file written in YAML:

      version: '3'
      services:
      jellyfin:
      image: jellyfin/jellyfin
      user: 1000:1000
      group_add:
      - "122" # Change this to match your "render" host group id and remove this comment
      network_mode: 'host'
      volumes:
      - /path/to/config:/config
      - /path/to/cache:/cache
      - /path/to/media:/media
      devices:
      - /dev/dri/renderD128:/dev/dri/renderD128
  3. If you wish to use the second GPU on your system, change renderD128 to renderD129.

  4. For trying out the unstable build, change jellyfin/jellyfin to jellyfin/jellyfin:unstable on your own risk.

  5. Check the QSV and VA-API codecs:

    docker exec -it jellyfin /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/vainfo
  6. Check the OpenCL runtime status:

    docker exec -it jellyfin /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/ffmpeg -v verbose -init_hw_device vaapi=va -init_hw_device opencl@va
  7. Enable QSV or VA-API in Jellyfin and uncheck the unsupported codecs.

Linuxserver.io Docker

LSIO Docker images are maintained by linuxserver.io, please refer their docs from GitHub - linuxserver/docker-jellyfin.

note

The paths of Jellyfin config and data folders in the official and LSIO Docker images are different. So they cannot be easily exchanged.

Kubernetes

This follows the same principles as for the Docker, with one small change that your container within the pod must run as privileged.

The devices in Kubernetes are added as host path mounts, they are not separated into separate volumes like in the Docker example.

  1. Example Kubernetes (API version 1) configuraton file written in YAML:

    # Example of an incomplete deployment spec
    apiVersion: apps/v1
    kind: Deployment
    metadata: ...
    spec:
    template:
    metadata: ...
    spec:
    securityContext:
    runAsUser: 1000 # Similar to "user: 1000:1000" on Docker
    runAsGroup: 1000
    supplementalGroups:
    - 122 # Change this to match your "render" host group id and remove this comment
    containers:
    - name: "jellyfin"
    image: ...
    ports: ...
    env: ...
    securityContext:
    privileged: true # Container must run as privileged inside of the pod
    volumeMounts:
    - name: "render-device"
    mountPath: "/dev/dri/renderD128"
    volumes:
    - name: "render-device"
    hostPath:
    path: "/dev/dri/renderD128"
  2. When the pod starts, you can check the QSV and VA-API codecs.

    If you get error: failed to initialize display, double check that the supplementalGroups are correct.

    kubectl exec <JELLYFIN_POD_NAME> -- /usr/lib/jellyfin-ffmpeg/vainfo
  3. Enable QSV or VA-API in Jellyfin and uncheck the unsupported codecs.

LXC And LXD Container

caution

This has been tested with LXC 3.0 and may or may not work with older versions.

  1. Query the id of the render group on the host system.

    note

    On some releases, the group may be video or input instead of render.

    getent group render | cut -d: -f3
  2. Install the required drivers on the host system.

  3. Add your GPU to the container:

    lxc config device add <CONTAINER_NAME> gpu gpu gid=<GID_OF_HOST_RENDER_GROUP>
  4. Make sure you have the requied devices within the container:

    $ lxc exec jellyfin -- ls -l /dev/dri

    total 0
    crw-rw---- 1 root video 226, 0 Jun 4 02:13 card0
    crw-rw---- 1 root video 226, 0 Jun 4 02:13 controlD64
    crw-rw---- 1 root video 226, 128 Jun 4 02:13 renderD128
  5. Configure Jellyfin to use QSV or VA-API acceleration and change the default GPU renderD128 if necessary.

LXC On Proxmox

note
  • Jellyfin needs to run in a privileged LXC container.

  • An existing unprivileged container can be converted to a priviledged container by taking a backup and restoring it as priviledged.

  1. Install the required drivers on the Proxmox host.

  2. Add your GPU to the container by editing /etc/pve/lxc/<CONTAINER_ID>.conf.

    You may need to change the GIDs in the examples below to match those used on your host.

    caution

    This has been tested on Proxmox VE 7.1 - on previous versions you may need to change cgroup2 to cgroup.

    lxc.cgroup2.devices.allow: c 226:0 rwm
    lxc.cgroup2.devices.allow: c 226:128 rwm
    lxc.mount.entry: /dev/dri/renderD128 dev/dri/renderD128 none bind,optional,create=file
  3. Restart your container and install the required drivers in your container.

  4. Add jellyfin user to the video, render and/or input groups depending on who owns the device inside the container.

  5. Configure Jellyfin to use QSV or VA-API acceleration and change the default GPU renderD128 if necessary.

Verify On Linux

note

Root permission is required.

  1. Install the intel-gpu-tools package on the host system, which is used for debugging Intel graphics driver on Linux. The name varies between distros.

    • On Debian & Ubuntu:

      sudo apt update && sudo apt install -y intel-gpu-tools
    • On Arch Linux:

      sudo pacman -Syu intel-gpu-tools
  2. Play a video in Jellyfin web client and trigger a video transcoding by setting a lower resolution or bitrate.

  3. Use intel_gpu_top command to check the occupancy of the engines as follows:

    note

    Duplicate engine names indicate the GPU may have multiple MFX video engines.

    • Render/3D - 2D/3D engine, QSV VPP or GPGPU workload

    • Blitter - Blitter/Copy engine workload

    • Video - QSV decoder or encoder workload

    • VideoEnhance - QSV VPP processor workload

    • Compute - GPGPU or QSV VPP workload (only available on ARC / DG2+)

    sudo intel_gpu_top

    intel-gpu-top: Intel Tigerlake (Gen12) @ /dev/dri/card0 - 86/ 349 MHz; 54% RC6
    441 irqs/s

    ENGINES BUSY MI_SEMA MI_WAIT
    Render/3D 19.86% |████████▊ | 0% 0%
    Blitter 0.00% | | 0% 0%
    Video 2.17% |█ | 0% 0%
    VideoEnhance 3.52% |█▋ | 0% 0%

    PID NAME Render/3D Blitter Video VideoEnhance
    ...

Low-Power Encoding

Intel video encoders on Gen 9+ graphics support two encoding modes:

  • Low-Power / LP encoding (VDEnc + HuC)

  • non Low-Power / LP encoding (PAK + media kernel + VME)

Low-Power encoding can offload the GPU usage with the help of the HuC firmware.

This can be useful for speeding up the OpenCL based HDR/DV tone-mapping.

tip

More detail information about Intel video hardware can be found here.

LP Mode Hardware Support

note

Gen X refers to Intel graphics architechure instead of the CPU generation. (i.e. Gen 9 graphics ≠ 9th Gen processors)

  • Gen 9.x SKL+ graphics - Support non-LP and LP (H.264 only) encoding.

  • Gen 11 ICL graphics - Support both two encoding modes.

  • Gen 11 JSL/EHL graphics - Only support LP encoding mode.

  • Gen 12 TGL/DG1+ graphics - Support both two encoding modes.

  • Gen 12.5 DG2/ARC A-Series - Only support LP encoding mode.

  • Gen 12.7 MTL and newer - Only support LP encoding mode.

LP Mode System Support

  • Windows supports two modes by default. No additional configuration is required.

  • Linux supports two modes only on Gen 12 ADL+ by default.

    On older platforms LP mode can be configured manually by passing a parameter to the i915 kernel driver.

Configure And Verify LP Mode On Linux

caution

The setup is not necessary unless you are using an Intel Jasper Lake or Elkhart Lake processor, or you want faster OpenCL tone-mapping speed on Linux. This also applies to the bleeding edge hardware such as 12th Gen Intel processors, ARC GPU and newer but step 2 should be skipped.

note

Root permission is required.

  1. Install the latest linux firmware packages on the host system. The name varies between distros.

    • On Debian:

      sudo apt update && sudo apt install -y firmware-linux-nonfree
    • On Ubuntu:

      sudo apt update && sudo apt install -y linux-firmware
    • On Arch Linux:

      sudo pacman -Syu linux-firmware
    • Pull firmwares from Linux repository directly:

      cd ~/
      git clone --depth=1 https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/linux-firmware.git
      sudo mkdir -p /usr/lib/firmware
      sudo cp -r linux-firmware/i915 /usr/lib/firmware
  2. Add the required i915 kernel parameter on the host system to enable loading GuC and HuC firmware:

    sudo mkdir -p /etc/modprobe.d
    sudo sh -c "echo 'options i915 enable_guc=2' >> /etc/modprobe.d/i915.conf"
  3. Update the initramfs and grub. The commands varies between distros.

    • On Debian & Ubuntu:

      sudo update-initramfs -u && sudo update-grub
    • On Arch Linux:

      sudo mkinitcpio -P && sudo update-grub
  4. Reboot the system and check the GuC & HuC status with the following commands, make sure there is no FAIL or ERROR in the outputs.

    sudo reboot
    sudo dmesg | grep i915
    sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/0/gt/uc/guc_info
    sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/0/gt/uc/huc_info
    • If you get a No such file or directory error when running the last two commands, try querying a dri device with a different number, for example 1:

      sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/1/gt/uc/guc_info
      sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/1/gt/uc/huc_info
    • On very old kernels (4.16-) the last two commands can be like this:

      sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/0/i915_guc_load_status
      sudo cat /sys/kernel/debug/dri/0/i915_huc_load_status
  5. Now you can safely enable the Intel Low-Power encoder in the Jellyfin dashboard.

tip

Extended readings for more distros: